Wipe out all Gods, God men, and Shankaracharyas from the face of the Himalayas

November 7, 2010

The Himalayan SplendourThe snow soaked whitest peaks of the Himalayas are the nature’s splendour and wonder to the eyes of the mankind. The world’s highest peaks, including the Mount Everest (elevation: 29,035.44 ft. / 8,848 m.) and K2 (elevation: 28,251 ft. / 8, 611 m.), are located in the Himalayas mountain range. The deep valleys, the high rise range of infinite view of peaks, the roaring rocks, the lusting lakes, the glowing greens, the flowing, falling lines of whitest water streams, the whitest flower-like showering of the purest snows, the glowing light emanating from the whitest peaks and pits, with an aroma of the chilling but soothing and healing breezes dashing around, are indeed a sight of instant ‘nirvana’ for a tiny man in the Himalayas. Here is the place where he suddenly finds his ‘ego and garbage’ bag suddenly missing from his head at least for a fraction of second.

Recently (during the fourth week of October 2010) we made a voyage and visit to the Himalayas covering Haridwar, Rishikesh, and finally Kedarnath (elevation: 3, 584 m.) and Badrinath (elevation: 3,133 m.) – the much revered holiest pilgrimage places in the Himalayas.

Salute our Holy Sadhus, unlike 5-star gurus!Thanks to modern technology and inroads of well-built tar roads along the sloppy lines of the peaks of the Himalayas, a taxi can take you rounds and rounds up to the point just 14 km away from Kedarnath. From that point you can either walk the 14 km stretch or take a horse ride (horse services available) to reach Kedarnath. One of my friends and me made a ‘sankalp’ (holy determination) to walk both up and down Kedarnath and we did it with all joy and pain. My other friends half way walked and half way took horse riding to reach the place. At the starting Peaks, greens, valleys, water flows: lifepoint of this 14 km stretch there is a place called ‘Gouri Kund’, a natural hot thermal spring lake, where naturally the hot water flows and the pilgrims take a bathing dip in it. We relished our ‘holy dip’ in the flowing hot lake, both while going and returning. This natural hot water has its natural healing and medicinal value, apart from being holy, it is believed. In the vicinity of Badrinath temple also there is a hot thermal spring lake facilitating the pilgrims to take a dip or bath in the holy spring before visiting the temple. (In the belt of the Himalayas, there are quite a good number of these hot thermal lakes located at different points, and incidentally one or the other temples may also be found around there to bless your holy hot dips in the lakes, amidst the biting cold weather surrounding there.)

To reach Badrinath (the abode of Lord Vishnu) is easy, as the taxi can take you directly up to that point, no strenuous walking is needed.

‘God men, Gods, the Holy Shankaracharyas have absolutely nothing to do with the Himalayas there. The snow-clad peaks and the splendours of the Himalayas stand there absolutely bereft of Gods and God men – the stand that is absolutely cute, mute, vibrant, and eternal.’Incidentally on the days of our visit to both Kedarnath (Temple of Lord Shiva) and Badrinath (Abode of Lord Vishnu), we witnessed huge snow falls – a splendid experience. In the night we stayed at Badrinath and when we woke up at 4 in the morning, we could see only snows and whites everywhere up down far near in the entire infinite peak ranges there that our eyes could see and reach. We could see almost 3-4 inches deep layer of snows formed every where around us on things, places and paths there. We played with snow flakes there like kids in the biting morning.

SuloHimaBut all things said and unsaid, I have to make a note from the depth of my core feeling or sense that I felt amidst the Himalayas there that: ‘God men, Gods, the Holy Shankaracharyas have absolutely nothing to do with the Himalayas there. The snow-clad peaks and the splendours of the Himalayas stand there absolutely bereft of Gods and God men – the stand that is absolutely cute, mute, vibrant, and eternal.’

The peaks, the splendours stand there mute!Rather these so called Godly people are a hurdle there. The highest snow-clad peaks and the infinite views of the ranges of the grandeur of the Himalayas are eternally so fresh and full of ‘life’ there. The true liberation of the humanity may occur only when all these holy God men and Shankaracharyas are totally wiped out from the face of the Himalayas. People need to be told as to how to lead a luxurious life, rather than trapping them in the hope of attaining (false) liberation, moksha and such other holy shits.

Random Reading Links:
(1) Himalayas [on wikipedia]
(2) Shri Kedarnath and Shri Badrinath Temples
(3) Haridwar [on wikipedia]
(4) Rishikesh [on wikipedia]

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Foes are Friends too: Osho’s Tribute to J. Krishnamurti

May 18, 2010

The beauty or the freedom with the masters is that two masters may never agree with each other and instead they indulge and enjoy the ‘game’ of abusing each other profusely. It is to be construed more as a ‘joyous play’, less as a ‘serious play’. It also happened among Osho, J. Krishnamurti, and U.G. Krishnamurti – a classic case here.

In the following excerpts, Osho speaks on the peak of J. Krishnamurti (11 May 1895 – 17 February 1986):

Death of the mystic, J. Krishnamurti,
Osho’s tribute

J. Krishnamurti died last Monday (17 February 1986), In Ojai, California. In the past you have spoken of him as another enlightened being. Would you please comment on his death?

The death of an enlightened Jiddu Krishnamurtibeing like J. Krishnamurti is nothing to be sad about, it is something to be celebrated with songs and dances. It is a moment of rejoicing. His death is not a death. He knows his immortality. His death is only the death of the body. But J. Krishnamurti will go on living in the universal consciousness, Forever and forever.

Just three days before J. Krishnamurti died, one of my friends was with him; and he reported to me that his words to him were very strange. Krishnamurti was very sad and he simply said one thing: “I have wasted my life. People were listening to me as if I am an entertainment.” The mystic is a revolution; he is not entertainment.

If you hear him, if you allow him, if you open your doors to him, he is pure fire. He will burn all that is rubbish in you, all that is old in you, and he will purify you into a new human being. It is risky to allow fire into your being—rather than opening the doors, you immediately close all the doors.

But entertainment is another thing. It does not change you. It does not make you more conscious; on the contrary, it helps you to remain unconscious for two, three hours, so that you can forget all your worries, concerns, anxieties—so that you can get lost in the entertainment. You can note it: as man has passed through the centuries, he has managed to create more and more entertainments, because he needs more and more to be unconscious. He is afraid of being conscious, because being conscious means to go through a metamorphosis.

I was more shocked by the news than by the death. A man like J. Krishnamurti dies, and the papers don’t have space to devote to that man who for ninety years continuously has been helping humanity to be more intelligent, to be more mature. Nobody has worked so hard and so long. Just a small news article, unnoticeable—and if a politician sneezes it makes headlines.

What is your connection with Krishnamurti?

It is a real mystery. I have loved him since I have known him, and he has been very loving towards me. But we have never met; hence the relationship, the connection is Something beyond words. We have not seen each other ever, but yet…perhaps we have been the two persons closest to each other in the whole world. We had a tremendous communion that needs no language, that need not be of physical presence…. You are asking me about my connection with him. It was the deepest possible connection—which needs no physical contact, which needs no linguistic communication. Not only that, once in a while I used to criticize him, he used to criticize me, and we enjoyed each other’s criticism—knowing perfectly well that the other does not mean it. Now that he is dead, I will miss him because I will not be able to criticize him; it won’t be right. It was such a joy to criticize him. He was the most intelligent man of this century, but he was not understood by people.

He has died, and it seems the world goes on its way without even looking back for a single moment that the most intelligent man is no longer there. It will be difficult to find that Jiddu Krishnamurtisharpness and that intelligence again in centuries. But people are such sleep walkers, they have not taken much note. In newspapers, just in small corners where nobody reads, his death is declared. And it seems that a ninety-year-old man who has been continuously speaking for almost seventy years, moving around the world, trying to help people to get unconditioned, trying to help people to become free—nobody seems even to pay a tribute to the man who has worked the hardest in the whole of history for man's freedom, for man's dignity.

I don’t feel sorry for his death. His death is beautiful; he has attained all that life is capable to give. But I certainly feel sorry for the whole world. It goes on missing its greatest flights of consciousnesses, its highest peaks, its brightest stars. It is too much concerned with trivia.

I feel such a deep affinity with Krishnamurti that even to talk of connection is not right; connection is possible only between two things which are separate. I feel almost a oneness with him. In spite of all his criticisms, in spite of all my criticisms—which were just joking with the old man, provoking the old man…and he was very easily provoked…. Krishnamurti’s teaching is beautiful, but too serious. And my experience and feeling is that his seventy years went to waste because he was serious. So only people who were long-faced and miserable and serious types collected around him; he was a collector of corpses, and as he became older, those corpses also became older.

I know people who have been listening to him for almost their whole lives; they are as old as he himself was. They are still alive. I know one woman who is ninety-five, and I know many other people. One thing I have seen in all of them, which is common, is that they are too serious.

Life needs a little playfulness, a little humor, a little laughter.

Only on that point am I in absolute disagreement with him; otherwise, he was a genius. He has penetrated as deeply as possible into every dimension of man’s spirituality, but it is all like a desert, tiring. I would like you back in the garden of Eden, innocent, not serious, but like small children playing. This whole existence is playful. This whole existence is full of humor; you just need the sense of humor and you will be surprised…. Existence is hilarious. Everything is in a dancing mood, you just have to be in the same mood to understand it.

I am not sorry that J. Krishnamurti is dead; there was nothing more for him to attain. I am sorry that his teaching did not reach the human heart because it was too dry, juiceless, with no humor, no laughter.

But you will be surprised to know—whatever he was saying was against religions, was against politics, was against the status quo, was against the whole past, yet nobody was condemning him for the simple reason that he was ineffective. There was no reason to take note of him….

Krishnamurti failed because he could not touch the human heart; he could only reach the human head. The heart needs some different approaches. This is where I have differed with him all my life: unless the human heart is reached, you can go on repeating parrot-like, beautiful words—they don’t mean anything. Whatever Krishnamurti was saying is true, but he could not manage to relate it to your heart. In other words, what I am saying is that J. Krishnamurti was a great philosopher but he could not become a master. He could not help people, prepare people for a new life, a new orientation.

But still I love him, because amongst the philosophers he comes the closest to the mystic way of life. He himself avoided the mystic way, bypassed it, and that is the reason for his failure. But he is the only one amongst the modern contemporary thinkers who comes very close, almost on the boundary line of mysticism, and stops there. Perhaps he’s afraid that if he talks about mysticism people will start falling into old patterns, old traditions, old philosophies of mysticism. That fear prevents him from entering. But that fear also prevents other people from entering into the mysteries of life….

I have met thousands of Krishnamurti people—because anybody who has been interested in Krishnamurti sooner or later is bound to find his way towards me, because where Krishnamurti leaves them, I can take their hand and lead them into the innermost shrine of truth. You can say Oshomy connection with Krishnamurti is that Krishnamurti has prepared the ground for me. He has prepared people intellectually for me; now it is my work to take those people deeper than itellect, to the heart; and deeper than the heart, to the being.

Our work is one. Krishnamurti is dead, but his work will not be dead until I am dead. His work will continue.

The above excerpts are sourced and reproduced from the [link].

Some Links:
(1) An Overview of Krishnamurti’s Life and Work
(2) The Core of the Teachings
(3) Jiddu Krishnamurti [on Wikipedia]


Gods and Guns

April 24, 2010

God and Guns

There is no much difference between Gods and Guns. God: remote fear; Gun: instant fear.
– –


No More Mistakes

March 12, 2010

God
is the very first mistake,
and Man
is the very second
as well as the last mistake.
If both of these species are wiped out from the face of this earth,
there will no more be
any mistakes left on
this planet.

– –


Even the Gods’ own food could not protect the ancient Egyptian priests from killing

February 26, 2010

Mummy Tummy FeastAn interesting rare insight-giving research article published in a recent issue of The Lancet may shed some amazing startling lights on ‘the gods, feasts, foods and rituals’ – all directly linked to the arteries and diseases among the ancient Egyptian priests. Now they say atherosclerosis – a blocked arteries disease – is no more a 20th century disease, but ‘history revisiting us’, to put it more appropriately.

The scientists studied the temple inscriptions and descriptions (not prescriptions!) encrypted or depicted on the walls of the ancient ‘There is unequivocal evidence to show that atherosclerosis is a disease of ancient times.’
Professor Tony Heagerty, Cardiovascular Research Group, Manchester University
Egyptian temples that listed out the food itinerary or menus of the rich ritual foods or feasts offered to the Gods by the ancient priests. At the end of the day of ritual (everybody knows the Gods could not or did not eat the foods or feasts offered to them, but the priests till today go on offering more and more rich foods to the Gods, but we do not know why?), the priests grabbed, packed all the rich ritual foods and carried home and they and their families ate the same together with grand fervors and celebrations to their hearts content. It is revealed Professor Rosalie David, an egyptologist from the University of Manchester, said:
“There couldn’t be a more evocative message: live like a god and you will pay with your health.”
that these ‘god meals’ were of beef, goose, bread, fruit, vegetables, cake, wine and beer, offered three times a day. To arrive at the conclusion, the scientists scanned and studied the arteries of priests’ mummified remains and found that many had blocked arteries – a clear link between the rich ritual foods and the artery disease. [Please read this interesting story full on the BBC News Link there: Ancient Egyptian priests ‘killed by rich ritual food’].